adlava, Author at bmm testlabs | bmm testlabs

“The Ox Is Slow but The Earth Is Patient”

“The Ox Is Slow but The Earth Is Patient”

“The Ox Is Slow but The Earth Is Patient”

The Storm family’s first visit to a WWO In-Country Program in Ayiti (Haiti) By Martin Storm, WWO Board Co-Chair SEPTEMBER 29, 2013 – DAY 1 Our life is a miracle in its conception and birth, but an accident in its circumstance! An average person born in Australia can expect high-class health care and education, abundant and nutritious food and clean water, affordable housing, quality public transport, excellent employment opportunities, family security, limited conflict, access to key infrastructure, participation in the arts and sports & recreation, and a stable, democratic political system. The sun seems to shine there even when it’s cloudy… But Ayiti is different. We drive by vast tent cities, crumbling post-earthquake buildings, rubble and filth where millions of people still live permanently, all cloaked in depressing grey… I see scrawny scavenging dogs, malnourished children whose lifeless stare doesn’t see me, and overly skinny teenagers roaming the streets looking for something, anything. I see that a family lives underneath a jacked-up broken down truck, perilously unperturbed. We stop by a Catholic Cathedral, collapsed except for its haunting exoskeleton. In its fractured shadow single mothers’ gather with their babies, a hollow-man shuffles, and a lone butterfly wings away. When we drive on I’m feeling anxious, absurdly anticipating a horde of revolutionaries careening past in jeeps and unloading their Kalashnikovs’ wantonly into the sky. I find myself thanking a god I don’t believe in for what I don’t see – the disease, the abuse and the slavery. It’s hotter than the sun in Ayiti, and colder than the moon… SEPTEMBER 29, 2013 – DAY 2 Our first day of WWO education began with a gentle walk in the mountains an hour above Port au Prince to visit WWO’s programs at the local Kenscoff Community Centre. Children between 0-5 years drew pictures and made footprints, and then enjoyed a reading of Babar in the Toy Library. There was interest and spirit and these very young children engaged to the extent that each was able. I couldn’t help notice how quiet many children were and I found myself thankful for the occasional outcry. We met some of the WWO youth volunteers acting as surrogate parents for a few hours every day, and we wouldn’t have known the difference given the affection and caring shown. The Storm family appeared cautious. We acted as interested observers but clearly unsure of how far to reach out in this first encounter. In the afternoon, and armed with a bagful of jumping ropes, Frisbees and Aussie-Rules footballs, we walked even higher into Kenscoff to meet about one hundred 6-16 yo children for outdoor recreation. Coming from a number of local orphanages and schools all of these boys and girls came from extremely desperate backgrounds. After a group warm-up of songs and stretching the fun began. In a moment, the children exploded into an energetic, picturesque disorder. They were laughing, smiling and playing. They were kicking and catching the footballs as if they had played with them their whole lives. They jumped rope and put on a puppet show. And thankfully the Storm family was fully involved. My 25-yo son Jacob was run ragged by an 8-yo boy playing football continuously for 20 minutes. At first glance, Ayiti was repulsive and frightening. But away from the traumas of Port au Prince and in the arms of WWO, this day was a very positive experience. And who are these WWO youth volunteers who lead and love these children? OCTOBER 1, 2013 – DAY 3 Today the sun is scorching. We drove two hours down the mountain into the peak...

Read More

Slide 3

Slide 3

Read More

Slide 2

Slide 2

Read More

Slide 1

Slide 1

Read More

BMM Testlabs pleased to announce membership in NASPL

BMM Testlabs pleased to announce membership in NASPL

BMM Testlabs (BMM) is pleased to announce that it has become an associate member of The North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries (NASPL). As BMM continues to service more and more Lottery providers, the NASPL membership is a particularly important step for the company. Jean Corriveau, Business Development Manager comments “BMM is very pleased to be accepted into the NASPL and we wish to thank Jake Coy, Project Coordinator, for guiding us through the process. BMM intends to be an active member of the association and we look forward to attending networking events and meeting other NASPL members.” Thomas Bierbach, BMM Testlabs Director of Lottery Security and Audit Services adds “Importantly, being an associate member of NASPL, BMM will have the opportunity to participate in educational events and working groups, enabling us to contribute to the ongoing and future development of the North American Lottery industry.” For more information on BMM Testlabs’ lottery services, please contact: Thomas Bierbach, Director of Lottery Security and Audit Services – thomas.bierbach@bmm.com Jean Corriveau, Business Development Manager –...

Read More